Feb 292016
 

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In this episode, we’re giving you a break down of the best picture nominees and our thoughts! First, we dive in to the recently released Fuller House and discuss the importance of Netflix original programming and why you should be watching Judd Apatow’s idea of what LOVE is!

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Feb 292016
 

thewitch

 

This week, Bill and Bryant go deep in to the New England woods and battle with THE WITCH! We’re going full on spoiler free in this episode and giving you our thoughts on the new horror film that some have called a master piece! After that, we’re delving in to our top 5 horror movies post 2000! All to your listening pleasure!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 262016
 

friday-the-13th-1980-poster

 

By: Bryant Daniels

Okay…okay, I have seen every Nightmare on Elm Street and every Halloween film, even part 3 (the one produced sans Michael Myers), but, to be honest, I had (until recently…which is why I’m writing this) had only seen Friday the 13th part 8 (Manhattan if you’re keeping a tally) and Jason X. I had never even attempted to watch the original…until it was $7.99 at Best Buy. Here I was, standing in line at Best Buy, staring at the cover art of a movie that is given credit as kicking off a whole generation of slasher films. Although, I don’t know if I should thank Sean “F13” Cunnigham for Sleepaway Camp…I wish I could erase that last shot out of my mental eye…uhhhhhhh.

Anyway, back to the review…as I said, I was standing in line, staring at the immaculate cover art,and to be honest, getting slightly excited to experience the original classic. This is what set in motion a whole chain of cinema that I fell in love with. All those years of creative kills, creative sex scenes, stale dialogue, and amateur actors trying their best not to laugh at the writer and go, “Really, you want me to say that?”. These movies are excellent because of one golden rule that they abide by, they know what they are and they aren’t afraid to exploit the shit out of that. You will not be walking in your local video shop and find a Criterion Edition of “Black Christmas”…although, they do carry “Armageddon” and “The Rock”, so there is something to be said about taste…

So, let’s get into the meat of this flick. Let’s really dive into the core of what makes “Friday the 13th” a classic among the fans of the horror genre. Is it the acting? No. Is it the fancy camera work? No. Is it the kills, the sex, and the shocking ending?  Absolutely, 1000 times yes to that…that is what makes this a classic, it is the last 45 minutes of pure, unadulterated entertainment. Because that is what this is…entertainment folks. The script is sub-par, the acting is wooden, the camera work is shoddy, but it’s all in fun.

The movie starts out with a young couple leaving a camp fire to go do…well, what else do young adult counselors do when all the children have been put to bed…they have wild hot beast sex that would make a porn star blush, and, following the natural order of slasher fare, the young couple is destroyed…with a knife. This first kill was a slight disappointment, but hey, I give props to this style, because I have seen it executed a thousand times after this…some good, some bad, some absolutely horrendous.

This sets up the film from this point out, as we jump ahead in time the audience knows that there is a killer in the area, we know that the camp has been shut down since the murders, and we know that there is no way in hell this camp is opening up again…no matter how many Cumbayas’ are sung.

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After this, and this is the one complaint I have about the movie, there is approximately 30 minutes of setup, this easily could have been cut down to 15 minutes and nothing would have been lost. I don’t care about the relationships, and I don’t care who likes who or why people took the job at the camp…let’s get to the murder. I don’t watch Slasher movies to think, I watch them to be entertained, if I want to sit down for a cerebral experience, I will watch Bergman or Godard (Love hate relationships), but with Slasher cinema I just want to see creative kills, get some cheap laughs, and maybe be generally disgusted a time or two (I’m looking at you Sleepaway Camp!)

The last 45 minutes are wonderful though and are everything I expected. My favorite personal kill of the bunch…seeing Kevin Bacon meeting his end via an arrow through the throat. Now, if you haven’t seen this, I will spoil it, because if you’re familiar with the series at all, you know Jason is not the killer in this one, hell, he’s a child. It is his mother dispatching of camp counselors, because they were busy doing the wild thing while her young, deformed son, was drowning…seriously though, did you see this kid, I wouldn’t wanna touch him, much less save him from drowning.

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So, overall thoughts: the script is sloppy, the acting is wooden, the camera work would have been better if you hired the guy from the late night infomercial circuit…but, I just can’t deny the appeal and the entertainment of this classic. So yes, “Friday the 13th” is a classic in spite of its self. I tip my hat to you Mr. Cunningham, you make-a my nightmares come true.

 – 6

Friday the 13th – 1980

Starring – Betsy Palmer, Adrienne King, Kevin Bacon, Jeannine Taylor, Robbi Morgan, Harry Crosby, Laurie Bartram, and Mark Nelson.

Directed by: Sean S. Cunningham

Run Time: 95 Minutes

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Feb 242016
 

Teenage-Mutant-Ninja-Turtles-2014-03-1

 

By: Bill Nelson

Well, bad movie fans, it’s time again for another glorious trek into the wasteland of cinema. This week we’re going to take a look at the 2014 reboot of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie series. There’s a lot to talk about with this movie but it helps to know the history. The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles were created in the early 80s by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird as a response to the gritty stories that were starting to turn up in comics at the time, essentially satirizing the more realistic stories by filtering them through the most fantastical characters. While the comic was never a major hit it developed a massive underground following and eventually spawned multiple popular animated TV series and a successful film franchise, though there hadn’t been a live action entry in the series since 1993 and only the computer animated TMNT released in 2007 to keep it alive.

Then, in 2009, Nickelodeon acquired the film and TV rights to the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles from Mirage Studios. Almost immediately rumblings began about a new began to echo through Hollywood. The trail to a new film was a strange one as Nickelodeon partnered with Platinum Dunes, the production shingle for action director Michael Bay. Bay, who is most widely known these days for his film franchise based on the Hasbro robot toy series Transformers, had developed a reputation over the years for his ability to choreograph action sequences like ballet but wasn’t well regarded for his ability to generate a deep, character driven story. Almost as soon as Bay’s involvement was announced stories began to leak regarding major changes to the Turtles origins. Bay had announced that the new film would be called just Ninja Turtles and that the turtles would actually be aliens who resemble humanoid turtles. With a collective groan every Turtle fan around the world bemoaned the fact that Bay was about to do them what he had done to the Transformers. A leaked script that found it’s way online in 2012 did little to assuage fans’ fears despite the filmmakers’ assurances that this was just an early draft of the film that was rejected as soon as Bay and his team came on board.

So now we finally get to the finished project. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles is actually not the horrendous affair you’ve probably been led to believe but it has more problems than it needs. It acts as a new origin story for the Turtles and their master/father figure, the rat Splinter. Originally Splinter was a rat raised by Japanese immigrant Hamato Yoshi and learned the ways of Ninjitsu by watching his owner practice from his cage. He then passed the art down to his ‘children’, the turtles, after they are all exposed to a mutagenic glowing green ooze in the sewers of New York following an attack by a ninja known as The Shredder that left Splinter’s owner dead. Now the Turtles and Splinter were exposed to the ooze in a lab where they were being experimented on by none other than April O’Neil’s father. When a fire breaks out in the lab a young April rescues them and releases them into the sewers where they continue to grow in both size and intelligence. However, it turns out that the mutagen is actually a cure for a terrible chemical weapon that O’Neil’s father’s partner, Eric Sacks, had developed with the intention of using the cure to make a fortune with his partner, the head of a crime organization called the Foot Clan…a ninja warrior known only as The Shredder.

So yeah, this isn’t the same Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles my generation grew up with. Personally, I don’t have a problem with the unnecessary connection between April and the Turtles so much as that the Turtles are practically background characters in their own movie. We don’t get a good look at them until nearly a half hour into the flick and even once we see them the story continues to focus on Megan Fox’s April and her intrepid investigation instead of the actual heroes of the movie. This is the same problem that Bay’s Transformers films suffer from and it’s a bad one. By focusing on the human characters the Turtles never get the chance to be anything more than caricatures. Raphael’s rage makes zero sense without proper context as do Raphael’s nerdiness and Leonardo’s determination. Even worse was Michelangelo’s horniness. Obviously, the Turtles are teenagers, they think, act, and feel human so it makes sense they would be attracted to human women just due to their exposure to our media but the constant pervy nature of Mikey’s personality is grating and creepy.

Truthfully, I can get into a lot more, like how radically different the Turtles look compared to previous incarnations or how ridiculous the Shredder’s outfit was, but after spending most of the article bashing the movie I think it’s worth mentioning some of the good. Basically, the flick is a bit of fun, pointless summer popcorn fare. When they are onscreen together the Turtles are entertaining and the mo­cap allows for a much greater and more realistic range of motion than any of the original live action films offered. The voicework is phenomenal, particularly Tony Shaloub of Monk fame playing Splinter. While he doesn’t bring quite the same gravitas that the now disgraced puppeteer Kevin Clash did in the first two productions, he brings a more lively version of Splinter to the table. On the live action side, Will Arnett kills every scene he’s in as Vern Fenwick, a character originally created specifically for the 80s animated series as a foil for April O’Neil. Arnett’s natural smarmy nature and sarcastic one liners keep the movie afloat when the Turtles aren’t present.

The movie itself floats along on most shoestring of plots, basically acting as a springboard from one set piece to the next but the script remains lively and it never takes itself too seriously. I mean, yes, I would have preferred the grittier, almost film noir style that the original 1990 production had, but as far as candy coated surface level remakes go, this one isn’t exactly unwatchable. Despite my better judgment, I’m actually serious to see where the sequel takes us. I mean with Stephen Amell cast as Casey Jones and famed Madea director Tyler Perry set to play  classic Turtles villain Baxter Stockwell along with the addition of fan favorite cartoon only characters Bebop and Rocksteady you almost have to at least see what they’re going to do. Well, that’s about it for today. Tune in next week for your next dose of Bad Movie Tuesday.

Stank Rating – Stank Rating:  – 7

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Feb 232016
 

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Join us as we have the X-Men quiz down between Bill and Derek as we explore the top 10 X-Men characters of all time! Also, in our BS20 this week, we discuss Jane the Virgin, Annihilation, and some side bar animated characters doing unspeakable acts! Pesky ads just won’t stop! We also give you some factoids about Golden Age

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Feb 222016
 

the-mummy-movie-poster-1999-1020199235

In a very special bonus episode of Behind the Pop, Bryant and his wife Kristina take a movie from their childhood and provide a commentary more insightful and delightful than film school. Join us  as we discuss the 1999 movie The Mummy, starring Brendan Fraser!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 222016
 

the-mummy-movie-poster-1999-1020199235

In a very special bonus episode of Behind the Pop, Bryant and his wife Kristina take a movie from their childhood and provide a commentary more insightful and delightful than film school. Join us  as we discuss the 1999 movie The Mummy, starring Brendan Fraser!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 212016
 

landscape-1452594620-deadpool-romcom-banner

This week, we’re joined by our new co-host, Derek, as we review the Deadpool movie and discuss the top 10 highest grossing R-Rated movies! Help us welcome Derek in typical Behind the Pop fashion by putting him on the spot! And join us this Tuesday, as we talk all about X-Men, and have a quiz down on the top 10 greatest X-Men according to IGN! We had some equalization issues for this episode and the two following, but we’ve got it fixed for next weeks episodes, and we appreciate your patience!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 202016
 

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By: Bryant Daniels

So, here we are again, it’s that time of the week where I watch a Criterion pick and give you my thoughts. No matter how many times I try and explore other directors, there is one constant that I consistently come back to: Francois Truffaut, particularly his films following the life of Antoine Doinel, a substitute for the director himself. Bed and Board is the fourth film to pick up on Doinel and his current goings on, and Doinel manages to remain the same romantic with a lust for life and a disdain for “responsibility.”

Bed and Board picks up a few years after Stolen Kisses. Antoine (Jean-Pierre Léaud, The 400 Blows) and Christine (Claude Jade, Topaz) are now married and overwhelmingly in love. They live together in a small community in Paris where a multitude of colorful characters pass day in and day out through their lives, and when appropriate, add their own commentary to the young couples journey. Christine is teaching violin to young students and Antoine is working on his latest endeavor, attempting to dye flowers though various means and methods in order to produce true red. It is romantic and full of whimsy. However, after realizing that there is no money in the flower dyeing business, at least not without putting in a great amount of work, Antoine goes off and finds employment with an American company operating in France. As the stress of the “real world” becomes a hassle, Doinel does what he does best, makes decisions based on wants and immediacy rather than weighing consequences.

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The thing that I love about Truffaut’s Doinel films is that they are honest takes on the everyday life and struggle of a pure romantic living in a society that demands responsibility. Truffaut often excelled with his more experimental outings, and his work within the confines of French New Wave was revolutionary, but his more straight forward narratives are the ones I find myself coming back to over and over again. The 400 Blows is one of my favorite films put to screen, and although his follow up work with Antoine never quite captures the same beauty of young romanticism, they remain honest reflections of a director dealing with his own shortcomings, and in turn, create a cathartic experience for those of us who can connect with the character.

Doinel is, in the only way I know how to put it, a likable bum. He has dreams and fantasies of writing professionally, but refuses to put in the work to make his dreams come true. He loves his wife with everything he has, but is not above temptation from strange women. He is selfish but gives everything he has to anybody in need. Essentially, he is a walking paradox. His actions contradict each other carelessly and he has no problem with it, in fact, he does not understand why the rest of the world does not understand his unique view of life. Truffaut was able to capture exactly what it means to be a human. So many films line their stories with tropes and archetypes that somewhere along the way the humanity behind the lens gets lost. Truffaut never abandons that idea of “art reflecting life” in its most organic and primal sense. That’s what it’s there for after all, to interpret our surroundings and ideas in to a cathartic medium, and I cannot recall another director who is able to do that as well as Truffaut. The sense of realism is uncanny.

Bed and Board maintains the hubris of youth that the past films dealt with. Antoine and Christine are still a young couple with dreams of starting a family. Christine, being the realist in the relationship, understands that certain dreams and ideas may need to be placed on hold. Antoine, on the other hand, wants to bring a child in to his dream and teach the child to become a great writer. Christine understands that some things get pushed away when responsibility becomes inherently more important, while Antoine lives by the fact that everything is going to be all right as long as they maintain their passions. There is a medium that exists here, but the couple does not see it. Thematically, there is a discussion of the balance and compromises that we make in life in order to be successful. When the scales tip too far one way, the unevenness has the possibility of destroying our existence.

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The engrossing element of this series is the idea of love being captured at different ages. As we progress and as we age, the concept and idea of love begins to take on a new meaning and finds a new place in our lives. In The 400 Blows we have the love of family that can be twisted and used against us. In Antoine and Collette, we have first love that is often unrequited. In Stolen Kisses, we have love from afar that transforms in to something more tangible as we move in to an understanding of ourselves in a relationship. In Bed and Board we have the love that can hurt us the most, the one shared between a husband and wife. And finally, in Love on the Run, we have a more adult version and understanding of the love shared between friends.

Overall: Bed and Board is the fourth film in the Doinel series directed by Francois Truffaut. As in the other films, Truffaut uses Bed and Board to explore love at different ages. The realism and theme of balance makes this an excellent feature that falls right in line with the rest of the Doinel films.

Bed and Board – 1970

Running Time: 100 Minutes

Directed By: Francois Truffaut

Written By: François Truffaut, Claude de Givray, and Bernard Revon

Starring – Jean-Pierre Léaud and Claude Jade

Rating: – 8

 

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Feb 192016
 

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By: Bryant Daniels

In 1976 director Michael Anderson released what Roger Ebert would call a “vast, silly extravaganza” while The New York Times exclaimed the same film to be “less interested in logic than in gadgets and spectacle”, that divisive film was Logan’s Run, and 36 years later it continues to split audiences and critics alike.  Currently the average user rating for this colorful sci-fi epic is 3.3/5 on Rotten Tomatoes, and holds an average of 4/5 on Amazon, which means nothing when the majority of the Twilight films hold an average of 4/5.  Seriously Amazon, please allow me to start adding specified ratings using the ever fleeing decimal system!  I mean, if I want to rate Superman III a 4.9/5 because I like Richard Pryor movies and have decided in a drunken rage that it was Richard Pryor’s third best performance, then that’s what I want to do.  Sorry, back to the review.

So, what is Logan’s Run, a classic, or a seriously flawed science fiction attempt that should be a lesson to all children to watch nothing with “serious” special effects pre-1977 (Nerd Cheer for SW)?  After letting LR digest for 24 hours, my internal gauge is swaying towards a necessary, anti-establishment sci-fi viewing experience.  Granted, the special effects are pre-Star Wars (see above joke), so the majority of the time I was filled with a mix of childlike glee as I viewed the effects with 21st century eyes.  You see, I have a special fondness for exuberant colors and sparklers substituting for laser blasts, and the first 45 – 60 minutes of this movie were a magnificent play land in my eyes.  I put this precursor in here because of one steadfast rule, if you’re going to make a recommendation for people to see a film, and you know there is a barrier, advise of the barrier and then blow that barrier away by detecting the intricacies that make the film great.

Logan’s Run is about a dystopian future in which society is trapped inside a series of inter-connected domes and no one lives past the age of thirty.  It is not that disease or famine causes a shortened life span, in fact all of the members of this futuristic society appear to be Adonis like Greek gods and are by all means living inside of a manufactured paradise.  No, the reason no one lives past thirty is that somewhere in this societies past, someone decided that if life was purposely shortened by government then people would be too busy living it up to be concerned with such trivial pursuits as war, politics, or questioning their leaders.  So, what happens when you hit thirty?  Simple, you are placed into Carousel where you are either incinerated or you have the chance of being Renewed (Hint – no one ever gets renewed, ever).  So, naturally, someone occasionally questions whether or not this is right, or decides life is way too awesome to die at thirty and runs.  This is where our hero comes in, Logan (Michael York), he is a Sandman and his job is to catch and execute runners.  So, when he’s assigned to find “Sanctuary” (a safety zone for runners), the head honcho computer with an attitude adds four years to his lifelock (the device for tracking citizens life lines) and says, “go get em boy”.  Naturally through the course of proceeding events Logan decides that his society is ape shit crazy and that people deserve the opportunity to live and gain experience naturally, hence the title, Logan’s Run.  If you want a more descriptive plot visit Wikipedia, or watch the movie for the reasons I am about to unfold.

Logans-Run

So, you’re saying Bryant, why the hell should we watch a silly sci-fi movie from the 70’s?  Because it is highly intelligent, extremely relevant, and LR should be necessary viewing for anyone who decides that politicians and computers are trustworthy.  There are some magnificent points to be extracted from Michael Anderson’s classic.  Being a dystopian film, there is the 1970’s rebellious message of do not trust anyone in authority, especially those who smile at you and tell you everything is going to be okay.  The smiling in particular is a slight nuance of the film that deserves film theory analysis.  These Sandman bastards are consistently smiling, even during the chase, well, especially in the chase.  This is representative of modern society as politicians are willing to smile during well crafted speeches, but in the dark seedy alleys of Washington we know there are secret deals occurring and Supreme Court judgments are being purchased with trades of prostitutes and cocaine, and the majority of these deals are in the name of career preservation.  I guarantee you that citizens will end up getting the shit end of the stick.  Sorry, I felt my anti-establishment, jean jacket wearing, high school self coming back in that rant, excuse me, I have to go listen to some Bruce Springsteen or Judas Priest.

Along with other anti-establishment messages are the criticisms about modern society.  The majority of the citizens of this dome are sheep and living gloriously in a hedonistic lifestyle awaiting death, or “last day” as it’s titled.  It’s befitting, and the sad thing is that this was filmed 36 years ago, and people are just getting worse.  Sure, you have your laptop, your cell phone, your iPad, your bag of McDonald’s, and you may be happy with that, but LR may say otherwise.  What has this immediacy of virtually anything really done for you?  Has reading the latest movie news made you a more intelligent and productive citizen, or are you too busy trying to distract yourself from what’s really going on that you forgot to look around occasionally and wonder, what’s here that I’m not seeing?  There is truth to be found in knowledge, but the only truths to be discovered are in utilization of knowledge, and I’m not talking about learning how to torrent so you can download Deadpool.

Along with a strong anti-establishment message, there is also religion being called in to question.  The idea of being renewed may be a discussion on eastern religions belief in reincarnation, and these beliefs are immediately called into question when it is soon discovered that no one is ever renewed in this society.  Do we even deserve to be renewed for silently giving into the culture that surrounds us without ever striving to improve our environment?  In conjunction with this is the question of whether Sanctuary actually exists.  I see this as the filmmaker working through his own beliefs in the afterlife.  As we have two characters discussing whether or not Sanctuary exists, and one character deciding that it is a pretty lie people tell themselves because they would prefer it to exist.  Seems like an obvious allusion to heaven, whatever side you may fall on, this is a debate that penetrates daily life.

So, why should you see it?  It’s a subversive and intelligent sci-fi film with relevant and universal questions.  Also, there are a lot of pretty colors and people melt when they are shot.  Either way, it comes as a high recommendation.

 – 8

Logan’s Run – 1976

Starring: Michael York, Richard Jordan, Jenny Agutter, Roscoe Lee Brown, and Farrah Fawcett.

Directed By: Michael Anderson

Run Time: 119 Minutes

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Feb 172016
 

speedracer25

 

By: Bill Nelson

The Wachowskis were once among the most visionary directors in Hollywood. They started out as a screenwriting duo, penning the highly underrated Sylvester Stallone/Antonio Banderas vehicle Assassins, then moved to directing, igniting the screen with the smoldering performances of Jennifer Tilly and Gina Gershon in Bound. Bound set them on a collision course with legendary producer Joel Silver and all of a sudden Hollywood was never the same. The Matrix was a film that in many ways came out of left field. The story was based on a comic book series of which almost no one had ever heard. The marketing was intriguing but did little to explain why we should see it. In large part, The Matrix owes its success to a lack of knowledge. The internet was still young enough in 1999 that movie spoilers were virtually non-existent, the Wachowskis, though rising stars, didn’t have the name power to immediately be hounded because of a flick they were making. The Matrix was one of the last movies to be made where word of mouth following its release was just as crucial to its success as any pre-release marketing and it sky-rocketed the Wachowskis’ careers into the stratosphere even as they were still developing their skills. As a result, I believe, their later films suffered. They were expected to deliver mega-blockbusters with every new film but no one factored in the fluke factor of The Matrix’s success.

The Wachowskis followed The Matrix with the less than stellar Matrix Reloaded and dismal Matrix Revolutions, then stayed out of the picture until it was announced they’d be re-teaming with Joel Silver on the big screen adaptation of long time anime fave Speed Racer. It seemed to be a match made in heaven, pairing the Wachowskis’ visual style with the unfettered zaniness of one of Japan’s silliest animes. So what went wrong?

In a lot of ways, we got the movie we were promised. Visually, the movie is astounding. The Wachowskis managed to capture the insanity of the races that make up the bulk of the original cartoon. Crazy contraptions and cut throat manuevers in tracks that defy the laws of physics amp up the excitement every time we see them and the directors wisely keep us focused on the action.

The problem of Speed Racer comes from a lack of story. Speed is wooed by a corporate sponsor with unclear but evil designs. Speed agrees only to seem to lose everything forcing him to work with rivals to get his family’s good name back. It’s about as thin as you can get and though the Wachowskis try to flesh it out with Speed’s guilt over the death of his older brother, there’s little driving this movie forward.

Of course we wouldn’t be talking about the movie if it wasn’t worth watching for some reason. The most obvious reason are the races. The visuals are spectacular and the cartoon racing gags actually translate quite well. Then there’s the casting coup of getting John Goodman as Pops Racer. Not only is he a perfect physical fit, but he brings a hopeful and exuberant yet world weary quality to the role. Goodman anchors the movie in a way that Emile Hirsch as Speed never quite does. Then there’s Spritle and Chim Chim. They are the most annoying characters from the cartoon and generally are in the movie as well, but they get the single best non-racing scene in the movie when they pretend to be ninjas while sneaking onto the villain’s plane in a poorly planned spying attempt.

There’s a lot to be desired for in the Wachowskis’ Speed Racer. Fans of the anime are right to hate it, but it’s not the horrible film the fanboys would have you believe. It’s the kind of mindless action movie that you can step back from the story and just enjoy the pretty scenery. Even an underused Christina Ricci and a poorly used Matthew Fox still make this a generally fun popcorn flick. The good news is that the Wachowskis’ stock is back on the rise. They continue to be among the best visual directors in Hollywood and with Jupiter Rising they stand poised to finally prove that The Matrix wasn’t a complete fluke. I don’t know about you, but I’m hoping that they do.

Stank Rating:  – 7

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Feb 152016
 

1991, THE ADDAMS FAMILY

In our FINAL episode on The Addams Family we aren’t taking you behind the scenes, no, we’re doing a Commentary! Watch the movie with Bill and Bryant as we discuss it live in the studio. It’s our first time doing this, so be kind, because I know you internet hooligans can get mean when you don’t like something. We kid, if you didn’t like something, let us know! We love you guys and hope you enjoy our commentary on The Addams Family Movie!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 152016
 

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In part two of our three part Addams Family series we discuss the television show and all of its sequels, repeats, re-imaginings, and video games! It’s getting weird in here, and we’re okay with that. We also tell you why The Addams Family was superior to its competitor The Munsters. First, in our BS20, we give our younger audience some recommendations for older movies and TV shows that still hold up to today!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

Edit: Okay guys and gals, I’ve fixed it the best I could and figured out the problem so it won’t happen again! Thanks for your patience in dealing with my idiocy!

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Feb 152016
 

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This week, your hosts, Bill and Bryant take a trip down spooky lane and visit the Addams Family! In part one of our three part series, we explore the creator Charles Addams, and his macabre life! We also go Behind the Pop on the comic strip and discuss some fateful meetings and some surprising information revealed by our research. But first, in our BS20 we talk about Kanye Wests video game, and Bill reviews Lego Dimensions!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

Edit: After listening to the published episodes, I noticed some peak issues on the audio. I have done my best to fix this and re-upload the episode! Part 2 is coming soon as it needed more work, and part 3 is unfortunately doomed. If there is enough demand we will re-record a commentary for the movie!

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Feb 152016
 

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By: Bryant Daniels

Akira Kurosawa was a genius. There’s no doubting that. Look at his output and contribution to film making. Whether it is providing a style totally unique at the time, or a comment on a changing society; Akira Kurosawa influenced everybody from George Lucas to Martin Scorsese. In fact, these two film makers were partially responsible for the United States importing Kurosawa films. Even if Rashomon ushered in the beauty of Japanese cinema to the West, it wasn’t until he was near death that he earned the name recognition he truly deserved.

What made Kurosawa so unique was a boldness in change that he represented. He was truly an artist looking for any new format or structure to play with. And in doing so, his personal narrative presented through the eyes of his characters continually shifted. On the outside, his films may appear to be simple tales, but when examined up close, they become unique tapestries drawing from a million different threads.

So, what makes Seven Samurai, out of all the films in Kurosawa’s lengthy career so breathtakingly unique? Partly it is due to how modern everything feels. Seven Samurai was released in 1954 and would go on to become a game changer for cinema all throughout the world. It’s a story of several samurais gathering together to save a group of villagers from bandits. Sure, we’ve seen plots like this before, but not when this film was released. Up until this moment, generally, heroes were alone in their attempts to conquer the evils of life; counting on their wits and unbeatable skills. Kurosawa, with Seven Samurai, gathered a group of unique and varied heroes, and anti-heroes, to complete the task at hand. With Seven Samurai, the world received a structure which would maintain success to this day. It gives the audience a deeper connection to the story, and allows for multiple bridging points.

Thematically Seven Samurai speaks to the nature of the blue collar protector. The samurai in the film have no connection to the farmers, but for a small pay of edibles, yet they are willing to put their lives on the line. It’s not as though the glory will be spoken of for years to come, in fact, Kurosawa makes it clear that the farmers will soon forget who actually saved them from the bandits. The samurai don’t do the things they do for fame or gold, or even necessarily to protect the farmers, but they complete their task with fervor out of a sense of duty and a sense of responsibility; knowing that they will be forgotten as quickly as they arrived.

Seven Samurai also qualifies as one of the most gorgeous films put to print. The landscapes and framework is filled with a portraitesque sense of style. It feels like the audience is actually living with these farmers in the 15th century Japanese countryside.

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And as breathtaking as the camerawork may be, the action sequence are choreographed to the tautness of a violin string. Tuned to perfect rhythmic intuition and executed with the masterwork of a symphonic conductor.

Seven Samurai is a classic, and honestly is one of the greatest films ever made. Often that is said with a degree of hyperbole, but Seven Samurai lives up to it’s massive reputation.

Seven Samurai – 1954

Running Time: 207 Minutes

Directed by: Akira Kurosawa

Written by: Akira Kurosawa, Shinobu Hashimoto, and Hideo Oguni

Spine No: 2

Starring: Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura, Isao Kimura, Daisuke Kato, Minoru Chiaki, Seiji Miyaguchi, and Yoshio Inaba

Rating:  – 10

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Feb 112016
 

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By: Bryant Daniels

Another Thursday, another throwback Thursday, and that can only mean one thing…it’s time for a retro review! The 1970’s were a strange, coherent rebellion in film making. Instead of the happy endings of the 50’s and mid 60’s, the late 60’s and 70’s in American film sang the songs of gritty realism. The majority of films ended on a miserable note, which was simply chorusing the cynicism the country was going through. Look at films like The Panic in Needle Park, Last House on the Left, or The Taking of Pelham 123; while there may have been positive outcomes for some characters, the majority of characters were either scarred or killed.

1979’s Alien is no different. It’s filled with cynicism and the reality of our own mortality, and a pessimistic view on our hubris and place in the universe. If you haven’t seen Alien, then I suggest it as recommended viewing, at least so that you can understand the vast difference between filmmaking now and filmmaking in the 70’s, which I personally believe needs to return to popular form. Sure, it was a different era, but it was a shift in filmmaking unlike any other in American history. It was significant, and Alien is one of the many films that represents those ideas and concepts.

Alien is a high concept idea. It’s a haunted house in space with a clever tag line, and plenty of blood and gore to please the most desensitized. But as much as it may be about a crew of rag tag company employees surviving against an unstoppable beast, it could also be a film about the corporate theocracy succeeding and a needed growth of distrust in the establishment.

No person on the Nostromo trusts Weyland-Yutani. Whether it’s regarding pay, company contracts, medical procedures, or whom they employee; nobody fully buys in to the company pride idea. There’s an undercurrent of distrust that drives that employees to do what is necessary to get by, mostly because they have to get paid, and they want to get home. Ultimately, even after the warning signs, the decision to placate the company becomes fatal for the crew as they let on board the most terrifying killing machine in film history.

The design of the actual alien, otherwise known as a Xenomorph, is almost perfect. It can survive the vacuum of space, it has acid for blood, a toothed maw that hides a retractable inner mouth, and it’s born from its host in a process I wouldn’t wish upon my nemesis. It is fear encapsulated. And it is born from us. It’s no surprise that the Xenomorph looks like a twisted nightmare come to life; after all it was developed by the late H.R. Giger (See Below.)

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The crew of the Nostromo doesn’t stand a chance, even with a flame thrower and enough gumption to charge head on in to battle. While they all hold a variety of specialties, the alien is just, well better. It may not be as smart or cunning, but it’s an animal that acts on pure instinct, which we often ignore in exchange for profit or well-being.

The most amazing part about Alien is that after 37 years, it still has the capacity to terrify and shock (lack one sequence which I’ve captured below). And that comes from a mix of Giger design, cramped atmosphere, taut storytelling, and a believable crew dealing with an impossible situation. If you haven’t seen it please do, Alien is one of the greatest horror movies ever made.

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Alien – 1979

Starring: Sigourney Weaver, Tom Skerritt, Veronica Cartwright, Harry Dean Stanton, John Hurt, Ian Holm, Yaphet Kotto, Bolaji Badejo as the Alien, and Helen Horton as the voice of Mother.

 – 9

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Feb 102016
 

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Bad Movie Tuesday – Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension

By Bill Nelson

Well, last week got off to a rousing start with Dumb & Dumber To. After looking at one of Hollywood’s bigger bad movies, though, it seemed like it was time to take a turn down a more familiar route. Horror movies are the life blood of bad cinema. I’ve said it more times than I count and it just never stops being true. Why? Well, because they’re usually reasonably cheap to make and almost always return at least a modest profit. In other words, ever Tom, Dick, and Igor can go out and make a terrible zombie/alien/monster movie and, with little to no marketing, make a few bucks.

This week we’ll be taking a look at one of the movies I was really hoping would be good in 2015, Paranormal Activity: The Ghost Dimension. By now, if you don’t know the basic premise of the series you’re probably new to the planet, but just in case here’s a brief primer. Spooky stuff happens while people are filming. People get freaked out and get super serious about trying to capture the spooky stuff on film more. The spooky stuff escalates and people die. To be less oblique, the Paranormal Activity movies are a found footage series of horror films. The initial film, written and directed by Oren Peli and starring Katie Featherston and Micah Sloat, was a surprise hit in 2009. Primarily the series follows an unseen demon (finally named Toby in Paranormal Activity 3) who torments various families in their homes. Of the six films produced in the series, only the first and third are really any good. The second one has a good twist ending that ties it nicely back in with the first but doesn’t do much to earn it. The Marked Ones stands as an interesting but ultimately dull side story to the main film series and the fourth one is just terrible. Where does The Ghost Dimension fall in this, though?

Ultimately, I would argue that this flick is actually a little better than the last main entry in the series, Paranormal Activity 4, but worse than pretty much everything else in the series. The story is more interesting, if only just barely, and the scares are a little more effective. It’s basic: a family finds an old box of videos in their attic showing the indoctrination of young Katie and her sister Kristi (the sisters at the heart of Paranormal Activity 1, 2, and 3) into the coven of witches introduced in the prior films. As the family watches the videos they make the eerie realization that, despite being filmed over twenty years earlier, the girls are somehow aware of their presence, reacting to things in the video that happen as they are being watched. At the same time, a presence begins stalking the house, attaching itself to the family’s young daughter, Leila. The presence, the invisible demon known as Toby, can only be seen through an old, highly customized camcorder found in the box with the videos. As the family realizes that their daughter is changing and something in the house has it in for them they begin filming everything that happens at night in order to find and put a stop to Toby for good.

There are some clever moments in the The Ghost Dimension. The ‘spectral’ camera is definitely put to better, scarier use than the infrared dots of the X­Box Kinect system in Paranormal Activity 4. And, while the movie never really shoots for anything more than jump scares, I will give them credit for being better handled than most modern horror flicks. The problem with the movie is that for all that it wants to be different and unique from the rest of the series while wallowing in the same tropes set up in those prior entries, it never really gets any further than a bad Exorcist wannabe.

I really, really wanted to like this movie. I remember discovering the first Paranormal Activity back in 2010 when it used to be on Netflix. It was late at night and pitch black except for my TV and I was thoroughly hooked by the simple premise and genuinely creepy atmosphere of the film. As the series aged, though, elements started popping up that could have made for an interesting mythology but were just never fleshed out enough to make sense. The Ghost Dimension was supposed to answer all the questions in the series and wrap it up with a bow, but I walked away still not quite sure exactly what the point was other than it had something to do with time travel. If you enjoyed the earlier films in the series, you’ll probably have some fun with this one but otherwise, you’re better off just watching the first 3 again.

Stank Ranking – 8.5

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Feb 082016
 

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In our final episode of Behind the Nick, we discuss one of the most inventive and truly terrifying show of the 90’s, Are You Afraid of the Dark? So, pull up a chair, take a seat, grab some coco and try to not loose your cool as we delve in to the terrifying, the  paranormal, and the unknown. First up, our Bullshit 20 is filled with some guilty pleasure recommendation. And stick around after the credits for a truly horrifying edition of Trashcan Theater!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 082016
 

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In Part 2 of our exploration in to 90’s Nick, we look behind the scenes at what has been triumphed as the greatest kids television show in history. One that introduced an entire audience to surreal and absurd comedy, along with a heavy dose of some rocking music. That’s right, we’re talking The Adventures of Pete & Pete; a 90’s kids show that took the everyday and made it extraordinary with bizarre characters and even stranger circumstances. We promise, this weeks Bullshit 20 is less about politics and more about lighter fare! And due to popular demand, Trashcan Theater will stay, so remain after the credits to hear our best impressions of those wacky characters from The Adventures of Pete & Pete!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 082016
 

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This week, we Snick up and begin our discussion about some of live action fair Nickelodeon offered in the early 90’s. In part one of our three part exploration, we go behind the scenes of Clarissa Explains it All, and try to answer the question…does she, does she explain it all? And in typical evolving fashion, we introduce two new segments to the show: The Bullshit 20 and Trash Can Theater. In The Bullshit 20, we talk for 20 minutes about anything we want to. This week, it’s all politics…if you’re offended, remember, these are just like our opinions man. And in Trash Can Theater we put on our Shakespearean hats and re-enact a scene from the ever loved Clarissa Explains it All.

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 052016
 

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By: Bryant Daniels

The idea of reviewing the Criterion Collection by spine numbers, is a daunting task. It’s just not that these films are generally complicated viewing endeavors, or that the collection is large enough to pack a walk in closet; although all of this was considered before I started my journey, the ultimate yoke was, and still is, the task of translating the story of Film that Criterion has been telling since 1984, which was an apt year for the company to start. So, with all due respect, here I go.

If you’re going to start a collection of “important classic and contemporary films,” starting with Renoir’s La Grande Illusion is a brilliant choice; not just because Renoir was voted the fourth greatest director of all time by Sight and Sound magazine, but also because La Grande Illusion may be the most important film within the ever populated war genre.

La Grande Illusion, on a pedestrian level, is about escape, and on a meta level, about escapism. Renoir himself served during WWI, and after sustaining a leg injury, discovered the magic of cinema during his recovery period. So it’s natural that the soldiers in La Grande Illusion find escape through art; whether it be books or music or tall tales of women in short skirts. It’s clear that Renoir draws a point to humanize every soldier in the film through passion. He creates a connecting line for every character. To be clear, there is no true antagonist of the film as one of the main criticisms drawn by Renoir is that war is ultimately futile.

Not only is the vision clear, but it’s poignant, especially today. Within today’s society, we are continually berated with images of silent villains committing evil acts, but we never really consider the motivation. As some will tell you, certain terrorist groups are pure evil, and while I do not condone their actions, there is much more to the story. Renoir’s La Grande Illusion only reminds me that the hidden atrocity of war is the blind killing of a shadowed enemy. In fact, the climax of the film focuses heavily on this subject. It criticizes those who kill without understanding. We often forget that we’re all human, and it’s a tragedy that things such as patriotism, a concept drawn out by invisible borders, propagates the message that murder for country is okay.

Don’t get me completely wrong. Again, I do not condone acts of terrorism. I am just stating that murder without at least some idea of what one is doing is wrong. So, in the majority of cases that involve war, both sides share the blame.

La Grande Illusion also greatly criticizes the once predominant class system of the aristocratic era. Ken Follett’s book about WWI was titled Fall of Giants. It’s partly due to the changing economic state after WWI, but also due to the disappearing class system that occurred after WWI. I feel as though Follett and Renoir would have a great deal to talk about. I also feel that Renoir would be greatly disappointed in today’s world. The class system feels like an archaic thing of the past, but the reality is vastly different from the illusion we hold today. The truth is, the class system still exists. It has just been transported by 90 years of history, and is sitting on the doorstep of the American men and women. Politics have become a perverted system of nepotism and favor. CEO’s play revolving chairs. And truly making it in today’s age is a game of name dropping and under handed deals. What it creates is a society that is not only carrying the weight of a marginalized population, but also a society that is ruled by a percentage of the population determined to pit the country against its self in a twisted cage match.

In one of the final scenes of La Grande Illusion an officer of aristocratic birth sacrifices himself for two lower class soldiers in the ultimate testament to a changing world; one which includes the men and women of lower birth rite in the same count as those born to a silver spoon.  It’s a show of good will, and speaks to the sad truth that without acceptance and requisition of the upper class, the lower class will never be allowed in. And it’s a lesson we’ve forgotten.

Ultimately La Grande Illusion is significant. I could discuss the great “musical” numbers, the progressive style of film making, the gray politics, or the choice of vilifying the situation over the oh so common “bad guy.” But I feel as though Renoir’s work, especially this one, is of greater importance because of how it speaks to today; it presents a message of peace through a revolution that starts at the top. Watch it. It’s a hard, but noble truth.

– 10/10

 

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Feb 032016
 

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Bad Movie Tuesday – Dumb and Dumber To

By Bill Nelson

Well folks, it’s 2016. Time for another reboot of everyone’s favorite article series, Bad Movie Tuesday. For the uninitiated, the concept is pretty simple. I go out and watch the bad movies for you and come back and tell you which ones are worth watching and telling people you watched, which you should probably keep quiet about if you did watch, and which are pretty much impossible to watch. These are just my opinions so feel free to take them with a grain of salt, but, keep in my mind my years of bad cinema experience if you do.

Now, on to the issue at hand. After such a nice long rest it didn’t seem right to come back if I wasn’t going to do something big. With that in mind, today we’re going to look at one of 2014’s biggest whiffs. To set the mood let’s take a trip back to 1994, when the internet was still new and comedy icon Jim Carrey was just starting his meteoric rise to the top of cinema history. It’s here that the movie going public at large was first introduced to the antics of Lloyd Christmas and Harry Dunne in the original Dumb and Dumber.

In many ways, Dumb and Dumber was a refreshing new attempt at classic slapstick comedy. Writer/directors Bobby and Peter Farrelly are unabashed fans of The Three Stooges (they also directed the 2012 attempted reboot of the Stooges franchise) and it shows in the original film. Yes, it is as dumb as the title makes it out to be, but the dumbness serves a purpose. There’s an underlying sweetness to Dumb and Dumber that makes you enjoy watching Harry and Lloyd even though you know if you spent any time with them in the real world you’d probably want to kill them. It’s hard to put into exact terms, but it just makes the movie work. From Lloyd’s unabashed love for a woman he spent all of maybe an hour with while driving her to the airport to Harry’s genial, good­natured, go along with anything attitude it’s apparent from the opening minutes of the movie these guys are just fun to watch.

Fast forward to twenty years later and suddenly things start getting a little stale. Dumb and Dumber To starts out strong enough with a great joke showing how Lloyd spent the last 20 years in a mental institution pretending to be in a catatonic state after his rejection by Mary Swanson in the first movie just to play an elaborate prank on Harry. Unfortunately this joke was both spoiled by the trailers for the flick as well as sets the tone for the entire movie. Instead of the goofy, dumb naivete that guided them in the first movie, Harry and Lloyd (particularly Lloyd) have developed something of a mean streak. The movie goes to great pains to make sure you’re aware they’re don’t realize how mean they are, but it’s hard to see even these two dullards not realizing that they are directly responsible for things like the death of their friend Pete ‘Pee­Stain’ Stainer or that a bicycle chained to a tree probably hasn’t been ‘abandoned’.

Beyond this, the movie doesn’t do anything new with the characters. It’s basically the same movie 20 years later. Substitute Aspen for El Paso and Harry’s supposed daughter Penny for Mary Swanson and everything else just kind of falls into place. If this movie had been made anywhere from 2­3 years after the original it probably would have been a serviceable sequel. I don’t think it would have rated any higher than it did, but it would have felt fresher. Granted, this is the first sequel in the Farrelly brothers esteemed careers, but I would have liked to see some growth in the characters, nothing that would seem out of character mind you, just some tweaking to show that they realize 20 years have passed as well. It’s almost as if Bobby and Peter just decided, ‘hell, they laughed at it then they’ll laugh at it now.’

That isn’t to say that the movie isn’t funny. There are some very funny sequences in the film. A personal favorite of mine was one that was only in the trailers where Harry and Lloyd realize that buses now have bicycle racks on the front so they opt to ride one…sitting on the bicycle pedaling while it’s hooked to the front of the bus. It’s just amusing enough that it could have made for a good running gag in the movie of them getting on buses and finding bicycles they’d abandoned earlier in the film still attached. There are other scenes that will make you laugh harder than you care to admit once you realize just how much of this flick falls flat. It’s the kind of movie you really, really want to like and while you might feel a little guilty to admit you kind of like it you’re more angry that, after 20 years of waiting to see it, it just didn’t live up to its potential.

For their part, Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels both slip back easily into the characters that made them cult icons in 1994. There’s a sparkle in Jim Carrey’s eyes that I haven’t seen in years and Jeff Daniels effortlessly steals the show time and time again. The rest of the cast is largely on point, particularly Rachel Melvin who plays the apparent daughter of Jeff Daniels’ Harry. She is so reminiscent of the way Jim Carrey played Lloyd in the original with just enough of Jeff Daniels’ awestruck at the world attitude that you can’t help but love her limited time on screen, even when she’s doing jokes far beneath her. Also, it’s fun to see Kathleen Turner play the middle aged version of the vixens she was known for back in the mid­80s and early 90s. The only real down point in the cast for me was Rob Riggle, who I’ve always seen as a poor man’s Danny McBride or Rob Cordry. He’s just not goofy enough to pull of the jokes he gets and not menacing enough to even be a good comedic villain. Plus, the whole playing your own twin gag is sadly tired when the joke is that they’re basically the same character.

On the whole, Dumb and Dumber To is a solid rental for a few good belly laughs, the kind of movie you’ll see on basic cable one day and end up watching from some random point in the middle all the way to the end. It’s not worth more than a single watch from beginning to end unless you’re a die hard Jim Carrey, Jeff Daniels, or Farrelly brothers fan. Well, bad movie fans, that about wraps things up for this edition of Bad Movie Tuesday. The only thing that’s left is the Stank Ranking. If you’re new to our particular brand of film review this is basically the opposite of your regular movie scoring. Movies are graded on a scale of 1­10 with 1 being the absolute best movie I’ve ever seen and 10 meaning I should get a medal and combat pay for watching the whole thing. Check below to see where Dumb and Dumber To fell on the scale.

Stank Ranking –

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Feb 012016
 

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Join us as we finish up our discussion of Battlestar Glactica with an over view of the 2004 remake. Welcome our new co-host, D-Isca (Daniel Spagnuolo), and find out how he takes the journey from a BSG virgin to being sold on the series!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

Edit: Be warned, audio issues midway through the episode…it is intermittent and we fix it after a few minutes! Thanks guys!

 

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Feb 012016
 

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Join us for part 2 of our discussion of Battlestar Galactica. This week, we’re covering the follow up series to the 1978 production, Galactica 1980! With a confusing and storied history, could things get any more bizarre…yes, yes they can!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

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Feb 012016
 

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In the premier episode of Behind the Pop, we’re discussing a beloved Sci-fi series straight from the past! That’s right, we’re going Behind the Pop on Battlestar Galactica! In part 2 we’ll be covering the 1980 follow up and in part 3 we’ll be discussing the 2004 re-imagining!

Intro Music Courtesy of https://mathgrant.bandcamp.com/track/space-blocks as provided under the Creative Commons License: Attribution, NonCommercial, Sharealike – If this Podcast were to reach commercial status, this theme would be replaced.

 

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